ICAO Language Proficiency Requirements — Rated Speech Samples

Language Proficiency Rating


Test Taker ID 002
Test Date 14 December 2004
Lead Rater ICAO
Assistant Rater(s) ICAO



Individual Ratings and Final Rating

(To be completed by Lead Rater)
Pronunciation Structure Vocabulary Fluency Comprehension Interactions
ICAO
Language
Proficiency
Level

(Lowest rating among individual ratings)
3 3 4 3 4 3 3



General Remarks

The test taker demonstrates proficiency at the operational level in Vocabulary and Comprehension. He generally needs to pay attention to his pronunciation, structure, fluency and ability to interact in order to meet the requirements of Operational Level 4.

Pronunciation

Many individual words are often pronounced distinctly but the use of inappropriate sounds affected by the test taker's native language frequently interferes with ease of understanding:

  • and now package it just enter (under) one of the seat (seats) (00:51 - 00:56)
  • uh. The first time I, I should descend, descend riynow (right now), at that time (01:17 - 01:24)
  • a low attitude (altitude) and may be uh, may be uh we also need (01:33 - 01:40)
  • In most of the situation, in most of the periods, uh just before the sansom, uh sansom (sandstorm) uh covered the airport (03:27 - 03:35)
  • if hea uh, a heavy ring (rain), or a middle to from a middle to heavy ring (rain), you, you must divert to your alternative (03:52 - 04:05)

There are stretches of speech where word recognition is difficult:

  • Just because when we are flying at flight level three one zero uh and maintain (00:23 - 00:32)
  • One controller uh, told me uh, instructed me uh, and instructed me to climb uh to flight level three one zero. (02:28 - 02:37)

In addition, there is little variation in the test taker's use of rhythm and intonation and he occasionally tails off into mumbling:

  • we can get it, the weather information or oh tell them oh- what *** it is, or ***, or something like that. (05:11 - 05:21)

Structure

Although the test taker produces some more complex structures:

  • Before landing uh, first time uh I uh, I should have caused (called) ground for, ground help, for ground help such as fire services and uh. (01:50 - 02:04)

Many of his basic structures lack control and leave the listener in doubt:

  • The purser uh, in cabin uh, to tell, tell (told) me about information about uh (00:32 - 00:38)
  • The first time (first) I, I should descend, descend riynow (right now), at that time (01:17 - 01:25)
  • but I am sure, but I am sure, it's not (it wasn't) my fault (02:49 - 02:54)
  • most of the situation uh they just uh would uh *** wait, waiting on ground for some time uh (05:48 - 06:00)
  • we can arrangement passenger for, uh, for, for hotel and uh something like that (06:37 - 06:46)

Vocabulary

The test taker possesses most of the vocabulary he requires for standard work-related topics:

  • purser (00:32 - 00:33)
  • destination (03:37 - 03:38)
  • forecaster (03:40 - 03:41)
  • high frequency (04:59 - 05:00)

but there are times when it is either inappropriate:

  • Of course, first time I, I should make a pronounce, a passenger pronounciation (announcement) (04:30 - 04:36)

or the test taker struggles to find the words, e.g. when talking about a package of explosives under a seat and also when talking about when passengers are waiting on the ground:

  • and now package it just enter (under) one of the seat (seats) (00:51 - 00:56)
  • most of the situation uh they just uh would uh *** wait, waiting on ground for some time uh (05:48 - 05:58)

Fluency

The test taker produces some stretches of language which are of an appropriate tempo, however, throughout the interview, phrasing and pausing are often inappropriate. Hesitation and slowness of language prevent effective communication on many occasions.

  • One controller uh, told me uh, instructed me uh, and instructed me to uh climb to flight level three one zero (02:28 - 02:37)
  • During my flying car…carrying (career) uh. Give me some sec (seconds), give me a few moments uh I thin (think)... In most of the situation, in most of the periods, uh just before the sansom, uh sansom (sandstorm) uh covered the airport (03:10 - 03:35)

The test taker also uses intrusive fillers:

  • uh ... uh (02:28 - 02:37)

His use of discourse markers is limited or clumsily connected to the body of his speech.

Comprehension

The test taker usually understands the questions asked and responds appropriately. When he is confronted with a new, more complicated topic, his understanding is slower. Due to the test format, it was not possible to evaluate his ability to deal with different accents or varieties of speech.

Interactions

The test taker responds appropriately to questions about redirecting passengers and also asks for time to think before talking about flying in rain. He attempts to pick up on some of his interlocutor's remarks:

  • sorry ... thanks uh thanks for reminding me (04:49 - 04:53)

However, he is usually quite slow to start talking and takes little part in initiating the topics under discussion. Communication breaks down for quite long stretches of time when he has to deal with more complex subjects.

Influence of the test format

The interlocutor is fairly constant in his delivery with the test taker. He uses only limited paraphrasing. However, the test format does not provide a variety of accents or unexpected situational complications to allow a full evaluation of ICAO Language Proficiency Requirements in Comprehension and Interactions.


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